Ray Davies: A Kink's Kareer In Klips
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“I AM A GENUINE OUTSIDER,” The Kinks’ Ray Davies tells MOJO magazine this month. “I find it difficult to integrate with society.” It’s a contrariness that makes Davies' music unlike anyone else's, and has motivated a stubborn and individualistic refusal to kowtow to the demands or expectations of the music business, then and now – sometimes (OK, often) to the commercial detriment of himself and his group.

You can see it in many of the Kinks and Ray solo performances collected below, from the compelling weirdness of Davies’ early-doors execution of Slim Harpo's Got Love If You Want It, to the daring honesty of his 2006 song, After The Fall, and the recusant philosophy of a brand new number – Poetry, from his forthcoming album, titled Americana.

It’s the essence – along with the simply extraordinary tunes – of what makes The Kinks and Ray the original cult artists of the rock era.

“You don’t consider yourself pop stars?” the Kinks were asked on America’s Clay Cole TV show in 1965. “We’re more impressionists,” replied Ray.

Impressionists doing a more than passable impersonation of genius.

MOJO 280, featuring career-spanning, in-depth Ray Davies interview.
MOJO 280, featuring career-spanning, in-depth Ray Davies interview.

It’s the essence – along with the simply extraordinary tunes – of what makes The Kinks and Ray the original cult artists of the rock era.

“You don’t consider yourself pop stars?” the Kinks were asked on America’s Clay Cole TV show in 1965. “We’re more impressionists,” replied Ray.

Impressionists doing a more than passable impersonation of genius.

You can see it in many of the Kinks and Ray solo performances collected below, from the compelling weirdness of Davies’ early-doors execution of Slim Harpo's Got Love If You Want It, to the daring honesty of his 2006 song, After The Fall, and the recusant philosophy of a brand new number – Poetry, from his forthcoming album, titled Americana.

It’s the essence – along with the simply extraordinary tunes – of what makes The Kinks and Ray the original cult artists of the rock era.

“You don’t consider yourself pop stars?” the Kinks were asked on America’s Clay Cole TV show in 1965. “We’re more impressionists,” replied Ray.

Impressionists doing a more than passable impersonation of genius.

 

RAY DAVIES IS ON THE COVER Of MOJO 280, WHICH FEATURES AN EXCLUSIVE FREE CD RE-COVERING THE KINKS’ CLASSIC 1967 ALBUM, SOMETHING ELSE. FIND OUT MORE.